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Welcome to theHouseandSenate.com - a website by Grace McMillan. Like this website? See more web design at GraceMcMillan.com.

Ethics: 2015 and 2016 Contributions Table

From the Oklahoma Ethics Commission:

2015 & 2016 Contributions Table

(Effective April 10, 2015)

To Candidate Committee To Political Party To Limited PAC
Individual
may give
$2,700* prior to primary
$2,700 prior to runoff primary1
$2,700 prior to general election2
$2,700 after the general election
Possible maximum contribution: $8,100 or $2,7004
$10,000 per calendar year $5,000 per calendar year
Party Committee**
may give
$25,000 for statewide office (prior to general election)
$10,000 to other state elective office (prior to general election)
Transfers between Political Party Committees Nothing
Limited Committee
may give
$5,000 prior to primary
$5,000 prior to runoff primary1
$5,000 prior to general election2
$5,000 after the general election3
Possible maximum contribution: $15,000 or $5,0005
$10,000 per calendar year $5,000 per calendar year
Limited Committee(registered for less than a year prior to a primary OR has fewer than 25 contributors)
may give
$2,500 prior to primary
$2,500 prior to runoff primary1
$2,500 prior to general election2
$2,500 after the general election3
Possible maximum contribution: $7,500 or $2,5006
$5,000 per calendar year Nothing
Unlimited Committeemay give Nothing Nothing Nothing
Anonymous donor
may give
$50 $50 $50
Candidate Committee
may give
$2,700 to another candidate committee
(Candidate may give unlimited amounts to own candidate committee)

 

$25,0007 Nothing

* This figure may increase by July 1, 2017 and every two years thereafter by the percent difference of the price index for the previous 12 months.

** State, Congressional District, County and Precinct Committees and other official party entities are aggregated.

1 After primary election and before runoff primary election if candidate appears on the ballot at the runoff primary election

2 After primary or runoff primary at which nominee is selected and before general election if candidate appears on the ballot at the general election

3 If no other contributions have been made

4 $2,700 for a candidate who is unopposed or whose name appears on the ballot at only one election; $5,400 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at two elections or $8,100 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at all three elections

5 $5,000 for a candidate who is unopposed or whose name appears on the ballot at only one election; $10,000 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at two elections or $15,000 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at all three elections

6 $2,500 for a candidate who is unopposed or whose name appears on the ballot at only one election; $5,000 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at two elections or $7,500 for a candidate whose name appears on the ballot at all three elections

7 Surplus funds only

2015 & 2016 Contributions Table (Effective April 10, 2015) PRINT VERSION

2015 Contributions Table PRINT VERSION

By |November 10th, 2015|How To ..., Quick Reference|0 Comments

How to Email your Legislator … from my point of view

  • We want to hear what you have to say.
  • We want to know who you are.
  • We are particularly interested if you are our constituent.

These are all very true statements. We mean them sincerely.

Another very true statement is that we get thousands of emails. Here’s how to email us efficiently.

Use this link to Find your Legislator. There’s nothing wrong with emailing all the legislators, but your legislator is the one who can help you with legislation, constituent concerns, etc. If he/she is not the person who can help you, they will direct you to someone who can.

Fill in the Subject line with a brief description of your concern. It’s the “title” of your email – good Subject lines help us to file the email for future reference.

Please give your name and address. This will tell us whether or not you are our constituent. If you are not our constituent, your name and address can help us direct your email to the proper recipient for best response.

If you wish only to tell us your viewpoint on a matter, that’s great. Fill the email with your concerns. We read them. 

If you have a question that requires an answer, please ask the question obviously. Perhaps you could put the question in a separate paragraph, or bold it.

If you would like our help with an issue, first give us the details, attaching all pertinent information. If you have names and contact information of related people, be sure to include that. If you want us to contact you, make that clear … and include a valid phone number/email address. If there is something specific that you are requesting our office to do … we’d love to hear it.

 

By |November 9th, 2014|From My Point of View, How To ...|0 Comments

It’s Easy to Vote in Oklahoma

I am 50 years old and 2014 is my first year to vote. Oh, yes, and I live in Oklahoma.

Which is good … because Oklahoma makes it easy to vote.

Now, you folks who have been American all your lives or who have lived in Oklahoma for years … probably already know this and you’re rolling your eyes at the enthusiasm of the newly converted (I just became a US citizen). But just in case you’re used to it … or take it for granted … the legal right to vote is very, very cool. I would do it even if it were hard. So the fact that it’s convenient is awesome.

Registering to vote is unbelievably easy. A registration form may be obtained online, from your county election board, the State Election Board, local post office, tag agency, library, etc. Fill out the form, sign it … and mail it in. Piece of cake. Five minutes and done.

I’m a busy professional and work more than one job … but not only can I find the time to vote in Oklahoma, there is more than one method available to me.

First of all, they have absentee ballots. People who are shut in, people who are disabled, people who take care of the disabled, or people who are away from home – Oklahoma makes it easy for those to vote. All they have to do is request an absentee ballot.

You can write the Election Board … or download a form, mail it in … and your ballot is mailed to you. No lines. No waiting. No getting out in bad weather. For the cost of a postage stamp you can have a voice in how they spend your taxes. The hardest part of absentee voting is finding a notary, but I bet your bank has one…. AND the law says notaries can’t charge a fee for this service.

But here’s what else is cool.  Any registered voter can vote by absentee ballot. You don’t need to give a reason. How easy is that? Oklahoma makes it easy for the busy person. They even have emergency absentee voting procedures.

But I’m a busy person with a tender conscience, so I want to do the research first. Oklahoma makes that easy, too. The State Election Board has an Online Voter Tool for registered voters. Fill in your name and birth date, press “Search,” and all necessary information comes up, including a sample ballot. That sample ballot is the very same one you’ll be filling out to vote.

No more guesswork. This means you can do the research on every single candidate listed on your ballot – at your own pace and ahead of time. Take the sample with you when you vote or reference it when you get your absentee ballot. Easy peasy.

Here’s what else that Online Voter Tool gives you: your voter id, your precinct number, where to vote, and the status of your absentee ballot.

Not only can Oklahomans vote on Election Day, they can vote three days prior to state and federal elections, including a Saturday! Yep. Just to make sure your voice is heard, Oklahoma encourages early voting.

It’s clear that Oklahoma really, really wants you to vote … even if you’re an American citizen living abroad. The State Election Board provides links and services to military/overseas voters and disabled voters. The new voting machines allow for disabled voters … and volunteers are standing by if you need assistance when you vote in person.

It seems as though every possible contingency has been anticipated. You’re not too busy; you’re not too far away; you’re not too disabled. If you can’t get out, Oklahoma will send a ballot to you. If you need assistance, volunteers are here to help. If you want to do the research, you have access to a sample ballot. Got an emergency, but still want to vote? Oklahoma will work with you to make that happen. Don’t know your Voter ID number? No problem. You can access the information online. Don’t know where to vote? Okay. Give your name and birth date; they’ll tell you the location of your polling place.

All you gotta do is be who you say you are. They’ll do everything they can to make voting easy.

Okay, then.

I’m registered. I’ve requested an absentee ballot and researched my candidates using the sample ballot built specifically for my location.

I’m gonna vote this year.

Update: I DID vote this year … and now I’m tracking the status of my absentee ballot; how cool is that?

Grace McMillan
Longtime resident, brand new citizen

By |October 23rd, 2014|From My Point of View, How To ...|0 Comments

Video: Vote using OK’s New Voting Devices

Video: eScan A/T Ballot Scanner

Video: Audio Tactile Interface

By |September 23rd, 2014|How To ..., Video|0 Comments

Time the Sending of your Email

Outlook 2010 calls it “Delayed Delivery.” Delayed Delivery allows you to specify a date and time when you want your email delivered.

Write your email, filling in your To and Subject lines.
Instead of “Send,” go to “File” and “Save” – it will be filed in your “Drafts” folder.

Go to your Drafts folder and open (double click) the email you just typed.
Click on the “Options” menu at the top.
Look for the option called “Delay Delivery” and set your delivery options.

Image: Timed Email

By |September 23rd, 2014|How To ...|0 Comments